FAO Projection for 2019 U.S. Corn Crop at 12.99 billion bu (330 mmt) + World Wheat S-D

Here is an article from the Foreign Agricultural Service regard their projections for the size of the 2019 U.S. corn crop.  They project a crop of 330 mmt or 12.99 billion bushels.

http://www.fao.org/worldfoodsituation/csdb/en/?utm_source=Ag+Insider+Subscribers&utm_campaign=a412282389-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2019_06_06_08_45_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_b0e8c666dd-a412282389-120343085

Diminishing maize production prospects in the United States dampen the global cereal production outlook this year

Release date: 06/06/2019

FAO’s latest forecast for world cereal production in 2019 points to an increase of 1.2 percent from 2018, to 2 685 million tonnes.

However, the year-on-year expansion is now much less significant than earlier predicted, as global maize production is now seen to fall in 2019, largely because of sharp downward revisions since the previous report concerning maize production prospects in the United States.

Due to prolonged excessive wet conditions resulting in major delays in crop plantings, this year’s maize production in the United States is now pegged at 330 million tonnes, down 45 million tonnes from FAO’s first production forecast published in May and almost 10 percent (36 million tonnes) short of last year’s level.

The recent USDA crop progress report pointed to a sharply reduced planted area of only 58 percent of planting intentions as of 26 May, well below the 5-year average level of 90 percent and the slowest pace ever recorded.  (Note: this has been updated to 67% planted as of June 2, 2019 – down from the recent 5 year average of 96%.  Daniel O’Brien, Extension Agricultural Economist, Kansas State University)

Most of the expected rebound in global cereal production in 2019 is attributed to expected expansions in wheat and barley production, with year-on-year increases of 5.3 percent and 5.8 percent, respectively. Total rice production is likely to remain close to last year’s record level as expectations of area-driven expansions in Asia could offset foreseen contractions in most other regions, triggered by inclement weather and prospects of reduced profit margins.

World cereal utilization in 2019/20 is forecast to reach 2 707 million tonnes, down 15.5 million tonnes, or 0.6 percent, from the May forecast but still 1 percent (26 million tonnes) higher than in 2018/19. Most of this month’s downward adjustment again concerns the United States, where, because of deteriorating production prospects, total domestic utilization of maize is seen to fall below the 2018/19 level. Following the revision for the United States, world utilization of coarse grains in 2019/20 is now anticipated to reach 1 434 million tonnes, down 0.9 percent from the previous forecast but 0.7 percent higher than in 2018/19. Global wheat utilization is expected to grow by 1.2 percent, reaching 755 million tonnes, while that of rice is predicted to reach 518 million tonnes, 1.4 percent higher than in 2018/19.

Based on the latest production and utilization forecasts, world cereal stocks could decline by as much as 26 million tonnes, or 3 percent, in the new season to a four-year low of 830 million tonnes. This figure is around 18 million tonnes, or 2 percent, below the FAO’s May forecast. The sharp month-on-month downward revision is mostly associated with maize, whereas the forecasts for wheat and rice inventories have been raised slightly since the previous report. The projected fall in cereal stocks would result in a drop in the global cereal stock-to-use ratio to just below 30 percent, which still points to a relatively comfortable supply level.

Globally, coarse grain inventories are seen heading towards a second consecutive annual decline in 2019/20, falling by 9 percent to just over 369 million tonnes, the lowest level since 2014/15. By contrast, total wheat stocks could expand by 4.6 percent year-on-year and approach a near-record level of 281 million tonnes. The increase of 1 percent in wheat stocks since May reflects upward adjustments made for the EU and the United States, outweighing downward revisions in Australia and the Russian Federation.  World rice stocks at the close of 2019/20 are still envisaged to fall slightly (0.9 percent) from their record opening levels, to 179 million tonnes, despite some upward revisions to forecasts for the United States and Viet Nam.

World trade in cereals in 2019/20 is forecast at around 414 million tonnes, up 1.2 million tonnes, or 0.3 percent, from the previous forecast and nearly 6 million tonnes, or 1.4 percent, higher than the estimated total shipments of cereals in 2018/19. Most of the predicted expansion in world cereal trade is associated with greater wheat and rice trade, while trade in coarse grains, most notably maize, is expected to fall below the 2018/19 level, mainly on expectations of reduced imports by the EU and a sharp reduction in exports by the United States. By contrast, wheat trade is predicted to rebound by 3.3 percent from the 2018/19 reduced level, driven by stronger import demand by several countries, especially in Africa and Asia, and supported by the expectation of large export availabilities in the Black Sea region and the EU. World rice trade, on the other hand, is likely to contract by 3.5 percent in 2019 before a possible rebound in 2020 on expectation of greater purchases by several countries in Africa.

KSU Weekly Grain Market Update – The position of grain markets just prior to the USDA Reports on 5/10/209

Grain market summary notes, charts and comments supporting the Weekly Grain Market Review from KSU Ag Economics presented in the KSU Agriculture Today radio program to be played on Friday, May 10, 2019 are available on the Kansas State University www.AgManager.info website at the following KSU web address:

http://www.agmanager.info/grain-marketing/grain-market-outlook-newsletter

The recorded radio program will be aired at 10:03 a.m. central time, Friday, May 10, 2019 on the K-State Radio Network (KSU Agriculture Today Radio) – web player available. A copy of the May 10th recording is be available at the KSU Agriculture Today website at this time.

Following are sections of the Working notes for this week’s radio program up on the KSU AgManager.info website…

KSU Weekly Grain Market Update (5/3/2019) – 2019 Corn Planting Problems, Kansas Wheat Tour Results, and Positive Feedgrain Export Trends

Corn Market Decision Time re: Planting Prospects

and

Examining 2019 Kansas Wheat Tour Results

Daniel M. O’Brien, Extension Agricultural Economist-Kansas State University

May 3, 2019

Point #1) Delayed U.S. Corn Plantings in May 2019

The situation with 2019 U.S. corn plantings as of May 3, 2019 is the following.  First, as of April 28th the USDA reports that corn plantings are delayed in several key corn producing states in the U.S. Corn Belt – most notably in Illinois (9% vs 43% 5-yr avg), Minnesota (2% vs 24% 5-yr avg), Indiana (2% vs 17% 5-yr avg), and Ohio (2% vs 13% 5-yr avg).  Plantings in Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, North Dakota, and Tennessee are also trailing the most recent 5 year average pace, but not a seriously as in IL, MN, IN, and OH.  With credible weather service forecasts for significant rainfall over many of these central and eastern U.S. Corn Belt states over the next week, prospects for timely plantings of 2019 U.S. corn acres are declining in a quantifiable manner.

Corn futures markets have not responded to this decline in 2019 U.S. corn planting and associated production prospects.  Within the next 1-2 weeks it seems these issues of 2019 U.S. corn planting prospects, how plantings could affect 2019 U.S. corn production, supply-demand balances, and expected corn prices for what remains of the “current crop” 2018/19 marketing year (MY) through August 31, 2019, and for “new crop” MY 2019/20 will all likely have to be dealt with by the corn futures and cash markets.

If the 2019 U.S. corn crop is planted in a timely manner, then it will have fully adequate soil moisture to begin development with – and which could provide for growth from May through June and into July.

However, if instead of the 92.792 million acres (ma) projected for year 2019 by the USDA in the Prospective Plantings report on March 29th, actual 2019 U.S. corn plantings are reduced by 5% down to 88.152 ma, or by 10% down to 83.513 ma, it would likely have significant, tangible, negative impacts on 2019 U.S. corn production.

At its current projection of 92.792 ma planted, 84.723 ma harvested (91.30% harvested to planted acres), and 176.4 bu/ac yields, the USDA is implicitly forecasting U.S. corn production in year 2019 would be 14.945 billion bushels

However, IF 2019 U.S. corn plantings decline 5% to 88.152 ma, then with 91.30% harvested-to-planted acres, there would be 80.486 ma harvested.  And with the same 176.4 bu/ac yield, U.S. corn production would be 14.198 bbdown 747 mb from the initial USDA implicit forecast of 14.945 bb.

In addition, IF U.S. corn plantings are down 10% from the USDA projection to 83.513 ma, then using the same harvested-to-planted acres factor of 91.30% to figure 2019 U.S. corn harvested acres at 76.247 ma, and using 176.4 bu/ac again, then 2019 U.S. corn production would fall to 13.450 bb down 1.495 bb from the USDA’s initial levels of 14.945 bb 2019 U.S. corn production.

Therefore, either a 5% or especially a 10% reduction in U.S. 2019 Corn planted acres would have significant negative impacts on U.S. corn production in 2019, leading to much tighter U.S. corn ending stocks, and higher cash prices as usage would be rationed on smaller supplies.

Point #2) Examining the Results of the 2019 Kansas Wheat Tour

This week’s 2019 Kansas Wheat Tour projected the 2019 Kansas wheat yield to be 47.2 bu/ac, with an implicit harvested acreage estimate of 6.494 million acres (92.8% harvested-to-planted acres off of 7.000 ma planted), and 2019 Kansas wheat production of 306,500,000 bushels (i.e., 306.5 million bushels or mb).   According to KSU Extension Agronomist Romulo Lulato ( lollato@ksu.edu), the Kansas wheat crop is 3 to 4 weeks behind normal in maturity, with the next month being crucial to crop development and possible disease threats.

Since year 2014, the annual Kansas Wheat Tour has UNDER-forecast Kansas wheat production by 10.4% (in 2015), 18.2% (in 2016), 15..6% (in 2017), and 12.3% (in 2018).  The reason for this under estimate of Kansas production in recent years has been a combination of underestimated yields, and especially low projections of harvested acreage.   During the years 2011-2018 period the Kansas Wheat Tour underestimated final Kansas wheat harvested acres each year, ranging from 4% too low in 2016 to 13.7% in 2011.  For instance, in 2018 Kansas harvested acres of wheat were implicitly forecast to be 6.576 ma, but ended up being 7.300 ma as estimated by USDA.  Following the same trend, it is possible the implicit harvested acreage of 6.494 ma for wheat in Kansas for 2019 could end up being too low.

Finally, total Hard Red Winter (HRW) wheat production in the central and southern plains states of Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas is forecast to be 638 million bushels (mb) in 2019, up from 523 mb for these states in 2018, but comparable to 635 mb in 2017, 870 mb in 2016, and 655 mb in 2015.  The 2019 forecast for Texas came from KSU Calculations, while those for Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, and Oklahoma came from the 2019 Kansas Wheat Tour.

An additional factor to watch as the 2019 Kansas wheat crop develops will be the levels of protein and/or other quality factors.  It is likely that significant amounts of the high protein / good quality 2018 Kansas wheat crop likely still in storage in Kansas grain elevators.  As a result, IF the 2019 Kansas wheat crop were of lower protein / quality, THEN it is likely that carryover supplies from the higher protein/higher quality 2018 crop would be blended with the 2019 crop to enhance marketability.

******

Grain market summary notes, charts and comments supporting the Weekly Grain Market Review from KSU Ag Economics presented in the KSU Agriculture Today radio program to be played on Friday, May 3, 2019 are available on the Kansas State University www.AgManager.info website at the following KSU web address:

http://www.agmanager.info/grain-marketing/grain-market-outlook-newsletter

The recorded radio program will be aired at 10:03 a.m. central time, Friday, May 3, 2019 on the K-State Radio Network (KSU Agriculture Today Radio) – web player available. A copy of the April 26th recording is be available at the KSU Agriculture Today website at this time.

Following are sections of the Working notes for this week’s radio program up on the KSU AgManager.info website…

KSU Weekly Grain Market Analysis Through 4/26/2019 – Watching Weather for Corn Planting plus Positive Sorghum and HRW Wheat Exports Weeks

Grain market summary notes, charts and comments supporting the Weekly Grain Market Review from KSU Ag Economics presented in the KSU Agriculture Today radio program to be played on Friday, April 26, 2019 are available on the Kansas State University www.AgManager.info website at the following KSU web address:

http://www.agmanager.info/grain-marketing/grain-market-outlook-newsletter

The recorded radio program was aired at 10:03 a.m. central time, Friday, April 26, 2019 on the K-State Radio Network (KSU Agriculture Today Radio) – web player available. A copy of the April 26th recording is be available at the KSU Agriculture Today website at this time.

Following are sections of the Working notes for this week’s radio program up on the KSU AgManager.info website…

KSU Weekly Grain Market Analysis Through 3/17/2019 – Floods, Wet Fields and Prospects for Delayed Field Work / Corn Planting

Grain market summary notes, charts and comments supporting the Weekly Grain Market Review from KSU Ag Economics presented in the KSU Agriculture Today radio program to be played on Friday, March 15, 2019 are available on the Kansas State University www.AgManager.info website at the following KSU web address:

http://agmanager.info/grain-marketing/grain-market-outlook-newsletter/weekly-grain-market-review

The recorded radio program was aired at 10:03 a.m. central time, Friday, March 15, 2019 on the K-State Radio Network (KSU Agriculture Today Radio) – web player available. A copy of the March 15th recording is be available at the KSU Agriculture Today website at this time.

Following are sections of the Working notes for this week’s radio program up on the KSU AgManager.info website…

KSU Weekly Grain Market Analysis: A “March 1st” Pre-Crop Risk Snapshot of U.S. Grain Markets

Grain market summary notes, charts and comments supporting the Weekly Grain Market Review from KSU Ag Economics presented in the KSU Agriculture Today radio program to be played on Friday, March 1, 2019 are available on the Kansas State University www.AgManager.info website at the following KSU web address:

http://agmanager.info/grain-marketing/grain-market-outlook-newsletter/weekly-grain-market-review

The recorded radio program will be aired at 10:03 a.m. central time, Friday, March 1, 2019 on the K-State Radio Network (KSU Agriculture Today Radio) – web player available. A copy of the March 1st recording will be available at the KSU Agriculture Today website.

Following are sections of the Working notes for this week’s radio program up on the KSU AgManager.info website…

2019 USDA Outlook Forum – “Grain and Oilseeds Market Outlook for 2019” (February 22, 2019)

The USDA is holding their 2019 Agricultural Outlook Conference in Arlington, Virginia on February 21-22, 2019.  On Friday morning of the conference the USDA provides its “Grain and Oilseeds Market Outlook for 2019”.  This report is prepared by members of the
Wheat, Feed Grains, Rice, and Oilseeds Interagency Commodity Estimates Committees in the U.S. Department of Agriculture

The public will be able to access this information at the following web address:

https://www.usda.gov/oce/forum/2019/At-A-Glance.htm

Following is the actual USDA Report of “Grain and Oilseeds Market Outlook for 2019”.

****************

Agricultural Outlook Forum 2019

Released: Friday, February 22, 2019

GRAINS AND OILSEEDS OUTLOOK FOR 2019

Prepared by Members of the Wheat, Feed Grains, Rice, and Oilseeds Interagency Commodity Estimates Committees   (This paper includes contributions from the World Agricultural Outlook Board, the Economic Research Service, the FPAC-BC, and the Foreign Agricultural Service.)

U.S. Department of Agriculture

Planted Acreage Outlook for 2019 (Table 1)

This paper provides USDA’s projections of 2019/20 U.S. supply, demand and prices for wheat, corn, rice, soybeans and soybean products. Projections presented in this paper include implications of the February 8 NASS Winter Wheat and Canola Seedings report, which estimated winter wheat area declined 4 percent to the lowest level since 1909. The projections assume normal weather conditions for spring planting and summer crop development, and the continuation of tariffs by China on a number of U.S. agricultural products. These forecasts will be updated in the May 10 World Agricultural Supply
and Demand Estimates (WASDE) report. The May WASDE will incorporate farmers’ 2019 planting intentions as indicated in the March 29 NASS Prospective Plantings report and survey-based forecasts for winter wheat production, as well as global, country-by-country supply and demand projections.

Among the 3 major crops, this year’s outlook represents a dramatic change from prior years because of China’s imposition of tariffs on U.S. soybeans. Relative to a year ago, soybean cash prices have declined, with pronounced weakness in the Northern Plains and Western Corn Belt, two areas that are particularly exposed to variations in the export market. In contrast, soybean cash prices have shown relative strength in the Eastern Corn Belt. Offsetting a forecast decline in soybean acres are increases in spring wheat, corn, and cotton acres. The total of 3-crop plantings, at 224 million acres, would be down 2.1 million from final plantings in 2018. This largely reflects expectations of a return to a more typical level of prevented plant acres. Season-average corn prices received by producers are expected to reach $3.65 per bushel, up 5 cents from the 2018/19 forecast. Soybean prices are expected to rise to $8.80 per bushel while wheat prices are up to $5.20.

Wheat Supply, Demand, and Price Outlook for 2019/20 (Table 2)

The 2019/20 outlook for U.S. wheat is for reduced supplies, minimally lower use, and decreased ending stocks. U.S. wheat production is projected 1 percent higher from 2018/19 at 1,902 million bushels despite the NASS Winter Wheat and Canola Seedings report showing 2019 winter wheat planted area at the lowest level since 1909. Higher expected net returns for spring wheat compared to soybeans in the Northern Plains is anticipated to result in greater spring wheat plantings in 2019 with total wheat acreage projected at 47.0 million acres, down 2 percent from last year. The all-wheat yield for 2019/20 is projected slightly up from the previous year to 47.8 bushels per acre and is based on a linear trend. The higher yield coupled with increased harvested area at
39.8 million acres offsets reduced planted area to raise 2019/20 production from last year. Lower carryin stocks are still expected to result in reducing 2019/20 supplies by 2 percent to 3,052 million bushels.

Projected 2019/20 total use is down only slightly from a year earlier. Domestic use is up 2
percent, primarily due to modest increases in both food and feed and residual use to 1,133 million bushels. The higher domestic use is more than offset by lower projected exports for 2019/20 to 975 million bushels. Greater export competition is seen from Australia and the EU in 2019/20 as both recover from last year’s drought. Although 2019/20 total use falls slightly, reduced supplies will result in ending stocks declining by 7 percent to 944 million bushels. While stocks remain burdensome, stronger export competition is expected to result in a modestly higher season-average farm price (SAFP) at $5.20 per bushel, compared to the 2018/19 SAFP midpoint price of $5.15.

Corn Supply, Demand, and Price Outlook for 2019/20 (Table 3)

The U.S. corn outlook for 2019/20 is for increased production, domestic use, and exports, and lower stocks. The corn crop is projected at 14.9 billion bushels, 3 percent above a year ago as an increase in area more than offsets a lower yield. The yield projection of 176.0 bushels per acre is based on a weather-adjusted trend assuming normal planting progress and summer growing season weather. Despite beginning stocks that are forecast down from a year ago, total corn supplies are up slightly on a larger crop.

Total U.S. corn use in 2019/20 is forecast to rise 1 percent from a year ago on increases to domestic use and exports. Food, seed, and industrial (FSI) use is projected unchanged at 7.0 billion bushels. Corn used for ethanol is unchanged from a year ago, based on expectations of flat motor gasoline consumption and a slight decline in ethanol’s inclusion rate into gasoline that is essentially offset by continued growth in exports. Feed and residual use is up 125 million bushels to 5.5 billion, with a larger crop and continued growth in grain consuming animal units. Corn exports are up 25 million bushels to
2.5 billion, reflecting expectations of modest growth in global trade and a slight decline in U.S. market share with competition from other exporters. Ending stocks are projected at 1.7 billion bushels, down 5 percent from 2018/19, supporting a 5 cent per bushel increase from a year ago in the expected season-average farm price to $3.65 per bushel.

Rice Supply, Demand, and Price Outlook for 2019/20 (Tables 4 & 5)

The 2019/20 outlook for U.S. rice is for reduced production, increased use, and lower ending stocks.  U.S. rice production is projected at 203 million cwt, down 9 percent from 2018/19. All of the production decrease is for long-grain as combined medium- and short-grain production increased nearly 2 million cwt. Rice planted area for 2019/20 totals 2.66 million acres, down 290,000 acres from the previous year. The long-grain area projection is down 300,000 acres but combined medium- short-grain rice is projected slightly higher. The all rice yield is projected up slightly from the previous year on byclass
trend analysis. Imports are projected to increase 0.3 million cwt to another record; aromatics are expected to continue to account for the bulk of U.S. rice imports. led especially by aromatic rice imports from Asia. Total 2019/20 U.S. rice supplies are down 3.2 million cwt from the previous year to 278.9 million cwt.

Total 2019/20 use is up 2 million cwt to 237 million all on higher exports, which are now projected at 102 million cwt. Long-grain accounts for the entire year-over-year export increase. Ending stocks for 2019/20 are down 5.2 million cwt from the previous year and below the 5-year-average of 43.5 million cwt. The all rice season average farm price is up $0.10 per cwt from the midpoint of the previous year to $12.20.

Soybean Supply, Demand, and Price Outlook for 2019/20 (Tables 6, 7 & 8)

The 2019/20 outlook for U.S. soybeans is for record supplies, higher crush and exports, and lower ending stocks. Soybean supplies are projected at 5.1 billion bushels, up 2 percent from 2018/19 with higher beginning stocks more than offsetting lower production. Soybean production is projected at 4.2 billion bushels, 8 percent below last year on lower harvested area and trend yields. The national average soybean yield of 49.5 bushels per acre is 2.1 bushels below last year. The yield forecast is based on a weather-adjusted trend assuming normal growing season weather.

Soybean domestic use is projected at 2.2 billion bushels, up 1 percent on higher crush. Crush is projected at a record 2.1 billion bushels as higher domestic use of soybean meal more than offsets lower exports. Lower soybean product exports reflect a recovery of Argentina’s crop after last year’s drought.  Soybean crush margins remain relatively strong with higher soybean prices mostly offset by small gains for soybean meal and soybean oil prices. Soybean meal prices are forecast at $320 per short ton.  Domestic use of soybean oil is projected up 2 percent for 2019/20 on gains for edible oil and biodiesel consumption. With lower projected soybean oil exports, soybean oil ending stocks for 2019/20 are projected at 2.04 billion pounds, down 3 percent from 2018/19. Soybean oil prices are forecast at 30.5 cents per pound, up slightly from 2018/19.

Soybean exports for 2019/20 are projected at 2.03 billion bushels, up 150 million from the 2018/19 forecast. With rising global demand and reduced supplies in Brazil this fall, some recovery in U.S. exports is expected despite continued import duties assumed for U.S. soybeans in China.

Soybean ending stocks for 2019/20 are projected at 845 million bushels, historically high, but down 65 million from 2018/19. With a smaller harvest and a 4 percent increase in total soybean disappearance, the ending stocks-to-use ratio is projected at 19.8 percent, down from 22.2 percent in 2018/19. The soybean season-average farm price is projected at $8.80 per bushel, up 20 cents from 2018/19.

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